Very many, but that’s when it gets interesting

Three months since I have landed in Dublin, Ireland for pursuing Master’s in Computer Science, the sojourn has been a nascent, sweet stint so far. It is hardly surprising that the students’ population is dominated by many Indians and Chinese apart from the Irish peeps.  A Master’s course is a more fascinating experience than any other Bachelor’s/Undergraduate for more than one reason. Majorly, the diversity. Likely, one gets to meet people of different ages, geographies and educational backgrounds. The variety people bring never ceases to amaze me.

This diversity factor has let me surmise the MOST common types of students you are highly likely to meet when you travel abroad for your Master’s study. Are you planning your higher studies abroad in the coming years? Well, this is the instruction manual for a storm that shall certainly strike you hard. If you are a student already, read, recollect, and rejoice. Go ahead and explore, you can thank me later.

The article is written in a lighter vein solely for entertainment purpose. Please do not personalize.

1. Uncle Bob:

Him: “Hey pal, I’m Bob, married thrice, divorced twice with four children, my eldest son has also accompanied me and we do our Master’s together now.”

Me: “Hi, SIR. Nice meeting you. I am apparently a year younger than your son. I am very happy you and I are classmates.”

 

2. The Nobel prize winner:

Him: “Hi I have 5 years of related work experience, own 2 companies, 4 software parents and 3 Olympic medals.”

Me: “Hi, I have 86% in my 12th standard and I also participated in essay writing competition in 7th grade. We both have a LOT in common.”

 

3. ‘High-school musical’ kiddos:

Me: Hey, you look so young.

Her: “Hey, yo. I got my Bachelor’s degree last week.”

Me: Oh, so when did you apply for Master’s?

Her: After my first-semester Undergrad results.

Me: Welcome, CHILD.

 

4. LinkedIn

Spends two hours studying but 10 hours trimming his CV and LinkedIn profile. Applies for 747 jobs in 359 companies for 1894 positions. Common words include: Career fair, referral, endorse, resume, cover letter, internship and connections.

 

5. Very specific to some Indians:

This guy is very commonly found. Assumes that 1.2 Billion Indians only speak Hindi and there is no other language existing.

Him: *in Hindi* Arey Bhai, main Amit hu.  Aapse milke bahut khush hua. Aur, aapka naam?

Me: *guessing that whatever he spoke must be some introduction* Hi, I am Niranjan. I have come for MS in Computer science. Sorry, I do not understand Hindi.

Him: “Oh TK bhai. Aur bataaiye, aapka kya haal hai? Kaise chal raha hai?”

Me: *what did I just tell you?*

For readers’ information: India speaks around 23 constitutionally recognized official languages apart from at least a hundred others.

 

6. The Social-drinker:

Sets outs for late-night drink parties every other night and justifies that they are singly for socializing and networking.

Well if that’s the case, take your CV along with you, it shall be helpful. Also, why don’t they conduct interviews in bars yet?

 

7. Master Chef

Student profile –

Technical skills: cooking and catering.

Projects: Chicken Dum Biriyani, Bisibelabath, Gulab Jamun, Chicken salmon.

Role models: Gordon Ramsay, Vikas Khanna, Venkatesh Bhatt, Mom.

Favorite websites: YouTube, Hotstar, allRecipes.com

Hobbies: Pursue Master’s.

Sincere request to all universities: Kindly honor all foreign students with an extra catering degree free of cost. I guess my friends couldn’t agree more.

 

Despite all such amusements, these are the people who are memorable and sometimes, admirable. There is a lot to learn and cherish. I honestly believe a Master’s course is a step closer to achieving your goals. The Master’s study, unlike an undergraduate, works like a crash-course which you use to hone specific skills that you would have already built.

If you felt good reading this article, share the blog, and share the fun. You can thank me later.

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